Volunteers have always maintained a place in extension programming (Wessel & Wessel, 1982). Twenty-two years later this sentiment has not weakened, as more efforts are made to understand the needs of volunteers in extension (Culp, 1997; Fritz, Barbuto, Marx & Etling, 2000; Ingram & Nyangara, 1997) and volunteer administration (Deppe & Culp, 2001, Culp & Kohlhagen, 2004, Hange, Seevers, & VanLeeuwen, 2002).

However, in a time of globalization and international development there has been little evidence shown as to how extension systems can utilize volunteers to enhance programmatic efforts and clientele outreach. Stedman and Place (2004) contributed to this be examining the perceptions and use of volunteers in international agricultural and extension development. Their study indicated that of 38 respondents, only 10 reported using volunteers in international agricultural programs.

While their study provided a base for this line of inquiry, the research results did little to determine what barriers prevented the use of volunteers in international agricultural and extension development. On average when scoring perceived barriers on a scale of 1 (Strongly Disagree) to 5 (Strongly Agree), scores did not exceed M=2.74, SD=1.10. Researchers concluded that additional unexplored barriers must be present preventing international agricultural and extension organizations from using volunteers.

Attachments:
Download this file (C016.pdf)C016.pdf[ ]106 kB